Paperback blog

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A clean and simple way to read Pinboard articles later.

Change Log — January 20, 2016

Time again for the yearly1 bug fix release:

  • New: hitting m in article view submits article content to fuckyeahmarkdown.com and displays the article content in markdown text
  • New: y archives, for fellow Fastmail users
  • Improves behavior of navigating in article list
    • Hover doesn’t hijack selected article when paging
    • Selected item properly scrolls into view when paging
    • Changed from j/k looping through list to, added G/gg to navigate to top/bottom, vim-style
    • Properly selects the next item after archiving from the article detail screen
  • Improves print layout
  • Added several custom parsing configs to help parse content on certain sites (email me pages that frequently break for you)

  1. Kind of a joke but not really. 

Change Log — February 23, 2015

I’ve finally been able to fix some long time bugs and test them out to make sure I’m not introducing any new ones:

  • Adds improved authentication to handle case where people could create account and bypass payment
  • Improved sync so the list stores properly after sync
  • Fixes an issue where an article that couldn’t be parsed properly displays the message directing you to the original page
  • Fixes an issue where the page could try to authenticate a few times in certain situations
  • Fixes issue where only a blank page would show after archiving all articles in your reading list

Paperback Is One Year Old

I introduced Paperback to the public one year ago today. In the last year since this launched, many other services have started, exploded in popularity, sold out, or shut down. Yet Paperback is still in its infancy. In the last year, it’s had decent uptime and relatively little support needs. It has also been slow moving in feature development but plans to be around for a long time.

One change I want to announce on it’s first birthday is that Paperback will go from a yearly subscription model to a one time fee.

From the start, subscriptions have been a bit confusing for customers and most support requests I see are about subscriptions.

Coming up to the 1 year mark meant subscriptions were about to renew. As with most services, only a small percentage of overall users and customers are actively using the site on a regular basis and I didn’t want to take “lazy tax” money from people who kept forgetting to cancel subscriptions for a service they weren’t using anymore. Nor did I want to an increase in support requests from people who wanted refunds for the automatic subscription.

It seemed like the best way to go for both customers and myself was to change to a one time fee and cancel any automatically renewing subscriptions from current customers.

But what about ongoing server costs with only a one time payment from users? It doesn’t cost too much per month to run my servers, so the income from the one time fee covers enough costs to operate. When I first launched Paperback, I didn’t know how quickly it would grow, how customers would receive paying for a service, or how much the server costs would be to handle the n number of customers I would get in my first days, weeks, and months. Now I have a pretty good idea of these things and and have adjusted things to the best experience for everybody. Even if no new customers sign up, there’s enough money in the bank right now to run the servers for 3+ years at the current costs.

If you’re an existing customer, thank you. You should see no change in service nor should you be charged again. If you do receive an email saying you’ve been charged for your subscription, please reply to the email and let me know so I can refund you.

Don’t forget to check out the Paperback roadmap to vote on feature requests. As always, if you have any questions or requests send an email or chat with me on Twitter.

—Nick

Paperback Public Roadmap

I’ve always like Trello. I’ve used it for many projects and enjoyed the flexibility it offered. After reading about how to use Trello as a public product roadmap, I thought that that idea would be a good fit for Paperback. If you look back at the introduction of Paperback last October, I wrote this:

This isn’t a “startup”, it’s a thing that I work on in my free time. I don’t want it to become a full-time job but I do want a respecting relationship between me and you, my customer.

Many startups wouldn’t dare post their roadmap publicly. It’s their secret. But out of respect of you and to help you help me make a better product, I’ve created a public roadmap for Paperback on Trello. I’d love for you to participate by commenting or voting on feature requests or issues you’d like to see addressed. The public can’t add cards or lists to the board but if there’s something you’d like to see on the roadmap, please email me.

Change Log — May 5, 2014

In my last post, The Obvious and The Future, I mentioned reworking the Paperback stack to be less tightly coupled. Well, that’s live now and even though it took a while to get there, I’m happy with what I’ve got. I’ve broken apart the pieces in to their own stronger services. From a high-level, Paperback now (mostly) runs off it’s own API, uses a much better and more customizable parser, and the web interface is a client-side web app which makes it snappy quick.

The Goods - Change Log

Interface updates: Tighter looking, less unnecessary buttons, more buttons where you need them. KISS.

Inline editing: As I was iterating the design of the interface, I thought a lot about the article page feeling a lot like text on paper. On paper, you can cross out, erase, write on, and change what’s in front of you with out going in to a “mode.” I wanted to get as close to that as possible. In this new version, you can edit the title and description/notes in place without having to go in to an edit mode.

I also learned that people using Paperback were taking a lot of notes while reading articles. To make this easier, I changed the Tag and Archive modal in to a sheet that—on desktop at least—sits at the bottom of the page when open, making it easy to type out notes while staying out of the way of the article text.

On desktop, bring up the edit sheet by hitting i (insert mode, like vim), or click the bookmark icon along the left side (at the top and bottom on mobile). Edit mode is still modal on iPhone and iPad because of screen size and annoying bugs in Mobile Safari.

You can add a selection to the notes but selecting text and hitting t (now just lower case t, unlike the previous version).

Making things a bit easier on mobile: We’re in development of the native version using the stable API. A few small new/better things on mobile:

  • Select text will pull up a green button which you can tap to add the selection to notes
  • The Edit modal is slightly less annoying
  • Uses minimul-ui in iOS 7 Mobile Safari to hide the chrome and give you more room to read

Some other cool things/things I’m happy about:

  • This might be one of the only infinite scroll web apps I’ve seen that doesn’t lose your position when you navigate back to the list. That was kind of a pain to pull off but is so worth it.
  • Articles now lazy load in. When you sync new articles in on the list page (hit the sync button in the bottom or hit s), if they haven’t already been fetched and parsed, you’ll see the grey bar load in to indicate that it’s ready and show the relative length of the article
  • The parser is much more customizable. If there are sites that you see that don’t parse correctly, let me know

A thing I’m not happy about: I had to pull tag typeahead out to get this shipped. I tried several times and just couldn’t get an implementation that I was happy with. This release cycle started stretching out really long and I didn’t want to go longer without an update so decided to ship without it. Sorry. I love that feature and will try to get it back in as soon as possible.

A Good Foundation

The way the web app is built now will enable quicker development of features like easier navigation between articles and sorting/filtering/group articles in something that might look kind of like Smart Folders. The API is the foundation that allows us to build the iOS app and other cool utilities.

Thanks again for using Paperback and hope you like the new bits.

The Obvious and The Future

I wanted to give a bit of an update on Paperback, now a couple months old.

What I launched initially was a very simple “blank slate” concept and I’ve been listening to how people use it and understanding more about how I myself have been using it to help decide where I want to go with product development.

The Obvious

The only way to get a great reading experience on iPhone and iPad (the device I like reading on the most) is with a native iOS app. Today I loaded up the first development build in the iOS simulator. There’s still a ways to go with it but work is getting done on it.

The Web

The desktop web is an important part for Paperback. Already there are some slick features for power users and people are using Paperback for real research and work at their desks rather than just reading for pleasure.

How They Come Together

I’m re-architecting the technology stack Paperback uses to prepare for the long term of having both a solid app and web site as well as being able to provide the experience I want in both. The gist is that I see both the app and the web as clients talking to an API1. Having the API run separately means that I can reduce the complexity in having to build logic on each side and in the long run hopefully have a more unit testable and bug-free system. If my API is doing the heavier lifting, like parsing and sync logic then I can rely on lighter clients. I’m building out the existing Paperback features (plus some updates for accessing Tagging and Archiving while on touch screens) with a dynamic Javascript framework2 rather than just having my PHP app rendering the views like they are now. My goals with this move is to have a more reactive and quicker interface on the web while getting on to a framework that will allow for more rich features down the road. A bonus with this is it’ll work as a chrome-less webapp on iOS when you save it to you’re home screen but unlike forecast.io, you’ll be able to use it in Safari as well. This will be a bit of a stopgap until the native app is shipping.

I think I have a pretty solid feature set in my head for 1.0 of a universal iOS app but if you’d like, send me some thoughts on what you want to see in it.


  1. Private at least until I see a good reason to make it public. 

  2. Angular, if you’re curious. 

Change Log — November 19, 2013

Thank you for using Paperback and all the kind things you’ve had to say since launch. This is the first time I’ve pushed any new features since launch six weeks ago because I wanted to pull back and watch how people were using it and then get my hands back into development with fresh eyes.

New

  • Added autocomplete of tags in Archive modal, as per requests
  • Added article of title to <title> so you can more easily recognize what you’re reading and find in tabs

Fixed

  • Improved behavior of Archive modal on iPhone, especially with those pesky toolbars that hide in iOS 7
  • Improved some layout issues in iPhone-sized Article views
  • Fixed text selection bug with Mobile Safari on iOS 7 where selected text wouldn’t be added to the Notes section in the Archive modal until tapping Archive a couple times.

Other Good News

The subscriptions from paying customers so far means that server costs should be covered for the growth and architecture changes that I’m expecting for the first year which means I don’t have to worry about how to pay my bills and can focus on building a service that you can use every day.

As always, email me with any support needs, concerns, or questions.

—Nick

Introducing Paperback

After about three months since my first prototype, I’m happy to introduce you to Paperback. Paperback is a clean and simple way to read Pinboard articles later. Paperback is a fully responsive web app with a simple experience on both desktop and mobile. If you’re not familiar with Pinboard, it’s a bookmarking service that lets you save URLs, tag them, and if you’ve upgraded, archive them so you have a permanent, offline store of every link you’ve saved.

I started building Paperback because I wanted the reading experience of Instapaper but with the reliable archival system of Pinboard. Paperback gives you a nice clean reading list and article view, free of distraction, keyboard navigation that rocks if you’re on a desktop, and powerful tools for tagging and archiving your articles back into Pinboard’s long term storage.

You can read more about Paperback’s features here.

Since I see Paperback as an extension of the great work that Maciej has been doing with Pinboard, it shares many of the same values:

  • Focus on speed and utility over “social”
  • Reliability
  • Simple, proven technology; Nothing fancy to see here

Paperback costs $15 a year. [Update: As announced on August 3, 2014, Paperback will become a one time fee for the service rather than a yearly subscription.] It’s unapologetically a paid service which allows me to make it a sustainable service. I want it to exist for a long time. This isn’t a “startup”, it’s a thing that I work on in my free time. I don’t want it to become a full-time job but I do want a respecting relationship between me and you, my customer. That means that you pay me for a service because you think it’s valuable and I maintain a service that you can trust. It being a paid service also constrains growth so that I don’t have to “scale” to support freeloaders.

Because it’s not a full-time gig and with that respect thing I mentioned above, I want to make sure I set some expectations:

  • Feature development will be slow and iterative: I am committed to continuously making this service better but it won’t happen at a startup’s pace. I think the current experience is great—I use it everyday—and think you will like what you see. I’m also looking forward to it being better.
  • With a focus on simplicity and reliability: this is a service I use myself. Reading through articles I’ve saved for later is one of my favorite things to do. I grab a coffee, sit down and read something maybe insightful, maybe educational, or maybe something that will make me laugh. I like the simplicity of reading and, like a good book, I want the experience to be simple. I also want it to be reliable so that every morning I can pull up Paperback and it will greet me with a sturdy smile. There’s still room for power-user features (there are already many) but building something that can be simple to use and that is reliable are priorities over any complex features.
  • Support: I’ll provide it in the best, most honest way I can. I can’t promise I’ll respond to every feature request but if you need a hand, I want to be able to respond to you within a reasonable time.

I really hope you love Paperback. Click here to check it out. Please contact me with any questions.

—Nick